The Tech Scene In New York Is Completely Changing

The New York tech scene has gone through a lot of changes in the past few years. The trend has started to stabilize as the excitement has worn off. In 2014 and 2015 a tech company in New York went public and their valuation exceeded $1 billion. By the year 2016 all of the IPO’s were gone although the year was not quiet. There were 421 new businesses with $9.5 billion in funding and 109 existing with a value well over $5 billion.

The numbers show similarities between the tech scene and traditional economy of New York. The investors and companies are not trying to make thousands by betting on companies that fail. They have turned to companies referred to as cash cows who make money not noise. The biggest private tech company currently in New York is Infor followed by a grocery store called Fresh Direct, the office space business WeWork and the insurance firm of Oscar. For more details on the new York tech scene please visit https://www.forbes.com/sites/quora/2017/05/05/how-the-tech-scene-is-evolving-in-new-york-city/#d54e09a6ffa5.

The workspaces, accelerators, events, business groups and government initiatives available in New York are supporting the companies. There are programs available to support entrepreneurs, international entrepreneurs, non-profit organizations and small businesses in industries from biotechnology to fashion. New York’s tech industry was originally located in Silicon Alley but has begun to expand north towards the Bronx and Harlem. The industry is expected to reach Queens and Brooklyn with all new developments.

Every tech region has a different focus. Silicon Alley consists of traditional tech companies including AdTech and Fintech. Brooklyn has been attracting companies such as CreativeTech and Urbantech while Queens has established Biotechnology businesses like FoodTech. Even the Bronx and Harlem are seeing good social enterprises. The biggest change is the loss of the tech companies’ independence. The line between traditional and tech businesses is becoming thinner.

Something is Phishy in New York City!

Starting on Friday, the band Phish will start a 13 concert marathon at Madison Square Garden. People from all over the United States, as well as the world, are going to show up. In a New York Times article posted on July 18th, 2017, people gave testimonies of how they made plans to stay in New York to see Phish. Many people have already made accommodations and have come here. Now, they are playing the waiting the game until their concerts begin. Some people may not have come here, yet, but will eventually arrive.

There will be a plethora of Phish-themed events that will go on as fans enjoy their time in New York City. There will be Phish themed children’s concerts, workouts, after parties, art shows, tailgate gatherings, flea markets and after parties. The Phish-bonanza does not just start and end at the concerts; there is a whole Phish-themed world that will exist in New York City during their 13 show marathon. You should expect there to be a very Phishy presence in New York City. Some say that the presence of the Phans will be visibly felt and that you might see a lot more tie-dye than usual. Over the course of 13 shows, it is expected that about several hundred thousand people are going show up. Roughly 1.6 million people live in Manhattan. Several hundred thousand is a pretty big fraction of 1.6 million, so it is very feasible to say that yes, you will feel the Phishyness throughout the borough.

For those who are into watching cover bands, the DeadPhish Orchestra, Pink Talking Phish and Jazz is PHSH will perform on daytime cruises. For those who love fish-inspired art, there will be an art showcase call PhanArt. At the J.C.C. Manhattan, there will be Phish-themed spinning classes that will include glow sticks and good music.

Brooklyn Park to Honor Biggie Smalls

Soon, the basketball court at Crispus Attucks Playground in Bed-Stuy, Brooklyn, will have a new name. After many unsuccessful years of trying to change the name of the court, City Councilman Robert Cornegy has finally fulfilled his promise to Notorious B.I.G., aka Biggie Smalls’ mother, whom he promised this honor many years ago.

The Councilman first tried to change the name of St. James Place, the apartments where the two grew up, in 2013. He began a petition to fulfill the change but was unsuccessful in gathering the required signatures. Many who didn’t sign the petition felt the rapper’s name shouldn’t be honored due to his violent lyrics.

Cornegy grew up with Christopher Wallace at 226 St. James Place in Bedford-Stuyvesant. He lived in apartment 1R. Biggie lived with his mother in apartment 3R in the same building. The pair was close growing up, often seeing one another in passing in the hallway. The two even hooped together on the basketball court that is being renamed in his honor.

A ribbon-cutting ceremony will take place on August 1 or 2 at the court in honor of the court’s renaming. For the past 20 years, a basketball celebration has been held in the rapper’s honor on August 5. Those who come to the celebration this year will have far more to look forward to, thanks to the authorization of the name change and the honor to this rapper.

Cornegy couldn’t be happier about the ribbon-cutting ceremony and the name change to honor his childhood friend turned successful rapper. Despite his violent lyrics and use of curse words, those who knew Biggie can tell you that he was down-to earth, honest, and always fun, simply doing what needed to be done to survive in Brooklyn.